A First Step in Making Strides

The end of Summer not only means the beginning of the school year, but also the beginning of the fundraising drives for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. Like last year, I’m happy to be involved in this wonderful event. The Making Strides Kickoff Event for Concord was held at Red River Theater.

In addition to information and tips for team leaders on how to have a successful drive, the event also hosts a guest speaker. This year’s speaker, Dr. Shannon Stott, talked about her research and development of a new cancer screening device.

Something I found particularly interesting about Dr. Stott was that she used to work in refrigeration and air conditioning. An area she worked on was a cooling system for the chemicals suits soldiers wear. Her work on this was around the time of the First Gulf War. I served in the Army for ten years and was in the First Gulf War. A cooling system for the chem suits would have been a blessing. However, that would be minor compared to the lives that could be saved by the cancer-screening chip she developed. People were fascinated by what she had to say about the device and how it works.

With the talk and the tips, team leaders left the event feeling energized and excited to get started. For more information or to form a team contact [email protected] or call 603-738-4404.

Here is the press release for the event:

The Volunteer Planning Committee hosted this year’s kickoff which is the official start to the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer fundraising campaign for the 23rd Annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer event taking place on Sunday, October 18, 2015.

The keynote speaker, Shannon L. Stott, PhD, an American Cancer Society Postdoctoral Research Fellow, is an Assistant Professor at the Massachusetts General Hospital’s Center for Engineering in Medicine and the Mass General Hospital Cancer Center.  Dr. Stott collaborates with molecular biologists and clinicians to translate the latest technologies into the devices that can impact cancer patient care. During her American Cancer Society fellowship, Stott co-invented a novel device for isolating specific cells, which can be found in the blood of patients with cancer. This progressive tool will help diagnose, monitor and guide patient treatment effectively.  Johnson & Johnson is bringing the technology forward for FDA approval in 2016.

With funding from the American Cancer Society, I helped develop a special microfluidic chip. When a small amount of someone’s blood is filtered through the chip, it separates cancer cells from other cells. I can then determine the cancer cells’ genetic fingerprint, identify the tumor type, and make sure the patient is receiving the treatment that is most likely to help her win her fight against cancer.

This work is leading to what will someday be a liquid biopsy, where a simple blood draw in the doctor’s office will diagnose cancer quickly and painlessly. No more surgical biopsies and a lot less waiting to see if the patient is getting the right treatment or not,” explains Dr. Stott.

“To know that Dr. Stott’s research was made possible by a grant from the New England Division of the American Cancer Society that our event contributed to funding is very validating.  Our Team Leaders and Sponsors will surely by inspired by the opportunity to hold this technology in their hands and learn that they played a role in something that will truly help make strides against breast cancer and all cancers,” says Kimberly Laro, Volunteer Director of Publicity.

For more information on Dr. Stott’s research visit: http://www.cancer.org/fight/finding-cures

[/vc_column][/vc_row]

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of
%d bloggers like this: