Children’s Behavioral Health Awareness Event

Recently, I had the opportunity to provide photography for an important event emphasizing the mental health issues of New Hampshire’s youth and how crucial it is that we offer them the support they need. In addition to photography, I also substitute teach in the Concord school district. I see children who need and benefit from good support. When we give children the help they need, they can grow up to have full, rewarding lives.

Thanks to Krystina for the following information about the event.

New Hampshire Children’s Behavioral Health Collaborative wants to spread the word that children and youth with mental, emotional, and behavioral health challenges need our support too. They also need treatment. While we know enough about mental health to say that treatment works, most youth with mental health disorders don’t receive treatment.

Nationally, May is the month to spread the word about this and other mental health issues. This year was the tenth anniversary of Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day, a day dedicating to focusing on children’s mental health. Events took place all over the country, but none celebrated Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day better than New Hampshire.

Governor Hassan spoke movingly about children and families with mental health challenges and issued a proclamation declaring May 7th Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day. JoAnne Malloy, University of New Hampshire Institute on Disability, and Kathleen Abate, Granite State Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health, also delivered presentations about the importance of mental health and a wraparound approach. All have been champions for children and families.

The day was an unprecedented show of support for and with children who have mental health challenges and their families.  Participants joined in activities including TEXT Talk Act from Youth MOVE and a photo booth. Participants also formed a huge circle on the state house plaza, and were photographed from a helicopter vantage point.  The circle we made symbolized the importance of wrapping around NH’s youth and families, with services and supports in their local communities.

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